Granta | The Home of New Writing

Explore In conversation

Interview

Sonia Shah

‘Non-native species have been blamed for being invasive the way that immigrants have been blamed for causing crime.’

In Conversation

Ellen Coon & Isabella Tree

‘The soil itself is filled with divine feminine energy. It’s alive, it’s pulsating.’

In Conversation

Peter Ho Davies & Celeste Ng

‘Some of the wisest things friends have said to me have been over text! But it’s a different kind of thinking.’

In Conversation

George Saunders & Natasha Randall

‘The way I write in general is basically just to move, in as a quiet-minded a manner as I can, toward what I feel as heat.’

Interview

Jay Bernard

An interview with the winner of the 2020 Sunday Times / University of Warwick Young Writer of the Year Award.

Interview

Daisy Lafarge

‘The earliest life on the planet was life without air, anaerobic bacteria that slowly died off when oxygen began to pollute the atmosphere’.

In Conversation

Ruth Padel & Ilya Kaminsky

‘Lines collect for years, but once in a while these lines meet up, and wink at other lines, go tangoing and make out, and a baby gets born – which is to say a stanza or if I am lucky the whole poem.’

In Conversation

Sophie Collins & Will Harris

‘I’ve been dreaming wildly in lockdown. Have you?’

Interview

Lynne Tillman

‘Things that we love, things that we hate – we need to crack it open.’

Podcast | Joanna Kavenna

Joanna Kavenna

‘We all now exist as avatars, on shining tiles in these cubist landscapes’

Joanna Kavenna discusses her all-too-familiar surveillance dystopia, Zed.

Podcast | Caleb Klaces

Caleb Klaces

‘I think the infrastructure of community around fathering is very limited.’

We discuss Caleb Klaces’s debut novel, Fatherhood.

Podcast | Sophie Mackintosh

Sophie Mackintosh

‘Imagine if an alien came to earth and asked, so how to you reproduce?’

We discuss Blue Ticket and the body horror of motherhood.

Podcast | Ottessa Moshfegh

Ottessa Moshfegh

‘Unless you are completely shut down and in denial, there’s no way you’re getting out of this without having changed.’

Ottessa Moshfegh on 2020 and her new novel.