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Bye-Bye Natalia

Michel Faber

‘Natalia picks at the frayed black lace of her dress while the photograph of her American penpal loads into the computer.’

Jenni Fagan | My Writing Playlist

Jenni Fagan

Best of Young British Novelist Jenni Fagan selects five songs that she loves to write to.

Zephyrs

Jenni Fagan

‘Every step forward causes the road behind him to disappear.’

In Utah There Are Mountains Too

Federico Falco

‘No one had ever spoken her name in a foreign language.’

Sonia Faleiro | Podcast

Sonia Faleiro

Sonia Faleiro on marginalized narratives, her time as a reporter and how gender influences her work.

Crossbones

Nuruddin Farah

‘In a world in which coercion is the norm, a human trafficker must have underlings as well.’

False Accounting

Nuruddin Farah

‘That's what money does to one: makes one suspicious.’

Vie du père

Alain Farah

L’homme dont les paroles ont inauguré cette histoire va donc voir ou plutôt revoir, alors qu’il se déplace dans un temps parallèle, les meilleures scènes de sa vie.

Life of the Father

Alain Farah

‘Two times is a repetition. Three times is a tradition, or a curse.’ Translated from the French by Lazer Lederhendler.

Cyan

Paul Farley

‘I’m holding out. / I’m blue in the face.’

Netherley

Paul Farley

For Granta 102, Paul Farley and Niall Griffiths returned to Netherley, on Liverpool’s north-eastern rim and the fringes of rural Lancashire, and to what remains of the housing estate where they grew up.

Kettle Holes

Melissa Febos

‘They knelt at my feet. They crawled naked across gleaming wooden floors.’

Five Things Right Now: Melissa Febos

Melissa Febos

‘I don’t care if anyone is watching and that’s the point.’

Teaching After Trump

Melissa Febos

‘In a country whose government we do not trust, who do we need more than writers and teachers? And what is more powerful than an inspired youth?’

Best Book of 1993: Written on the Body

Melissa Febos

‘Influences imprint themselves on our consciousness as light does a photograph, or trauma the psyche’

Dragon Island | New Voices

Laura Fellowes

‘This is a wartime story. It is the spring of 1943 and Europe is burning; look down and see.’

The Naming of Moths

Tracy Fells

‘Sophia no longer worries about how life smells, if she breathes in too deeply all she tastes is ash.’ The 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize winner from Canada and Europe.

On Buying a Clavichord

James Fenton

‘Your clavichord breathes as sweetly as your heart.’

Road to Cambodia

James Fenton

‘The buildings were full of surprises. In one, surrounded by winking lights, the last abbot was lying in his coffin. He had died a year before, and it would be another two years before he was cremated.’

Cambodia and Someth May

James Fenton

‘When I first saw the draft of the piece which follows, I realized that the book he was writing had reached an essential stage of articulacy.’

The Fall of Saigon

James Fenton

‘I wanted to see Vietnam for myself. I wanted to see a war, and I wanted to see a communist victory, which I presumed to be inevitable. I wanted to see the fall of a city.’

The Snap Revolution (Part One: The Snap Election)

James Fenton

‘It was the Cuba of the future. It was going the way of Iran. It was another Nicaragua, another Cambodia, another Vietnam.’

The Snap Revolution (Part Two: The Narrow Road to the Solid North)

James Fenton

‘Most of his life has been spent under Marcos's rule, and his habit of thought was to doubt the story as presented in, say, the newspaper, and to try to guess the story behind the story.’

The Snap Revolution (Part Three: The Snap Revolution)

James Fenton

‘Late that night Marcos came on the television again, and whereas in the previous press conference he had maintained a gelid calm, now he was angry and almost out of control.’

The Truce

James Fenton

‘Sotero Llamas was proud of the price on his head.’

Kwangju and After

James Fenton

‘Some people said they were not ‘with’ the students. They were not in favour of the use of arms. But they were of one voice in saying that the students were their sons, and that if the army came in the students would be put to death. That was why they kept saying: “Tell the truth about us.”’

More Afraid of You

Joshua Ferris

‘On Bainbridge Island, across the Puget Sound from Seattle, there are two modes of living: downtown and inland.’

The Unnamed

Joshua Ferris

‘Coffee and a powdered doughnut sat on his desk, the morning offering.’

Marcelo Ferroni | Interview

Marcelo Ferroni

‘This is an exciting moment for Brazilian literature. We may see a batch of new, vibrant novels, really soon.’

Let There Be Light!

David Feuer

A secular psychiatrist encounters the deeply religious in Brooklyn with unorthodox results.

When We Fight, We Have Our Children With Us

Madeline ffitch

‘We are all politically involved whether we like it or not, and children are already on the frontlines.’

The Snow Geese

William Fiennes

‘Are these great journeys examples of learned or inherited behaviour?’

First Story

William Fiennes

‘We talked a lot about voice – the idea that everyone has a voice, their own voice, and this is something to be valued and celebrated.’

Burying the Bones

Orlando Figes

’There are times when every nation needs to think a little less about its history.‘