One Hundred Years and a Day | Tomoka Shibasaki | Granta

One Hundred Years and a Day

Tomoka Shibasaki

Translated by Polly Barton

‘After a while people’s faces began to fade, and they came to seem like hoards of noppera-bō, faceless spirits gliding by.’

Two stories by Tomoka Shibasaki.

Tomoka Shibasaki

Tomoka Shibasaki was born in 1973 in Osaka. In 2000, she published her debut, A Day On The Planet, later made into a 2004 film by Isao Yukisada. Her 2007 novel Sono machi no ima wa (That Town Today) was awarded the Geijutsu Sensho Newcomers Prize, the Sakunosuke Oda Award and the Sakuya Konohana Award. In 2010, her novel Asako I & II received the Noma Newcomer’s Award; the book was subsequently adapted for screen by Ryusuke Hamaguchi and screened at Cannes. In 2014, Shibasaki won the Akutagawa Award for her book Spring Garden, now translated into many languages including English (published by Pushkin Press). Her latest work is A Hundred Years and a Day, an experimental collection of thirty-three stories. Other notable works include Panorara, Machidōshii (I Can’t Wait), Sen no Tobira (A Thousand Doors), and Watashi ga inakatta machi de (In a Town Where I Wasn’t).

Image © Takeshi Funayose

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Translated by Polly Barton

Polly Barton is a translator of Japanese literature and non-fiction, currently based in Bristol. Her most recent full-length translations include Spring Garden by Tomoka Shibasaki (Pushkin Press) and Where the Wild Ladies Are by Matsuda Aoko (Tilted Axis/Soft Skull Press), and her translation of Kikuko Tsumura’s novel, There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job, will be out with Bloomsbury in November 2020. Her debut non-fiction work, Fifty Sounds, will be published by Fitzcarraldo Editions in April 2021.

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