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Shining the Boot

Sarah Bernstein

‘I did my work and looked perfectly happy, tidy and unobjectionable, shining, shining the boot.’

New fiction from Sarah Bernstein.

Two Poems

Padraig Regan

‘Would / the apple be concerned / if I said it was not an apple’

The Schoolmaster’s Enemy

Missouri Williams

A new short story by Missouri Williams, author of The Doloriad.

Two Poems

Lee Young-ju

‘All I do is write in my sickbed diary. It’s been a while since I’ve done anything else.’ Two poems by Lee Young-ju translated by Jae Kim.

Three Poems

Eric Amling

‘They have friends everywhere / They have the iffy look of people that are free.’ Three poems by Eric Amling

Introduction: On Staying at Home

William Atkins

‘If the following pieces can be said to have an overriding characteristic, it is that they take seriously the experience of being a stranger.’

Guest editor William Atkins introduces the issue.

On Mistaking Whales

Bathsheba Demuth

‘The people who lived here lived in the heads of whales.’

A historian from New England goes to the Bering Strait.

The Steepest Places: In the Cordillera Central

Ben Mauk

‘In the mountains, however, Duterte seemed to have met his match.’

Ben Mauk meets the mountains of Luzon.

The Dam

Taran N. Khan

‘Invisible borders are not the same as open borders.’

Taran N. Khan on Hamburg’s Steindamm.

Travelling Secretary

Emmanuel Iduma

‘My life unfolded within the net effect of my father’s choices.’

Memoir by Emmanuel Iduma.

Graffiti Mobili

Jennifer Croft

‘The picture of a postcard is a geograft, a scion of a place thrust into the life of a resident of somewhere else.’

Jennifer Croft on graffiti and the history of the postcard.

16 Sheets from LOG

Roni Horn

Artwork from Roni Horn’s long-term project on Iceland.

The Ninth Spring: One Day at the Kolibi

Kapka Kassabova

Kapka Kassabova visits the Osmanovi family in the southern Balkans.

Tala Zone

Pascale Petit

‘Even when I travel as far as India, you are with me and I am re-entering our cellar.’

Memoir by the poet Pascale Petit.