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Home: Reflections for Anthony Shadid

Various Contributors

‘I realize it is my fault: whenever I live in any country, everything turns wrong. I see it as a gift.’

Santiago Roncagliolo

Roncagliolo was born in Lima, and his family temporarily left Peru for political reasons in 1977. His novel Pudor (2005) was made into a film and his political thriller Abril rojo received the Alfaguara Prize in 2006 and is published in English as Red April (2010). Memorias de una dama (2009), tracing the origins of the Mafia in Cuba, was censored and its publication is prohibited throughout the entire world. His latest novel La Pena Máxima (2014), is set in the 78 World Cup during the Argentinian dictatorship. His work has been translated into more than twenty languages. In 2010, he was chosen as one of Granta's Best Young Spanish Language Novelists.

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Anthony Shadid

Anthony Shadid was a foreign correspondent for the New York Times and former Baghdad bureau chief of the Washington Post. Over a fifteen-year career, he reported from most countries in the Middle East. He won his first Pulitzer Prize in 2004 in International Reporting for his coverage of the U.S. invasion of Iraq and the occupation which followed. He won a second in 2010 for his coverage of Iraq as the United States began its withdrawal. Shadid is the author of two previous books, Legacy of the Prophet: Despots, Democrats and the New Politics of Islam (2001), and Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War (2005), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in the US. Shadid died of an asthma attack while attempting to leave Syria on horseback on 16 February 2012.

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V. V. Ganeshananthan

V. V. Ganeshananthan teaches creative writing at the University of Michigan. Love Marriage, her first novel, appeared in 2008.

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Alia Malek

Alia Malek is an author and civil rights lawyer. Born in Baltimore to Syrian immigrant parents, she began her legal career as a trial attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. After working in the legal field in the U.S., Lebanon, and the West Bank, Malek, who has degrees from Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities, earned her master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. Her reportage has appeared in The Nation, Salon, The Christian Science Monitor, The WashingtonPost.com, The Columbia Journalism Review, and The New York Times. A Country Called Amreeka is her first book. She is currently editing the next volume in the Voice of Witness series.

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Teju Cole

Teju Cole is a novelist, photographer and critic. He is the author of the novel, Open City, which won the 2012 PEN/Hemingway Foundation Award, and the essay collection Known and Strange Things. He has published two photobooks, Blindspot and, most recently, Fernweh.

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Rabih Alameddine

Rabih Alameddine was born in Amman, Jordan to Lebanese parents, and grew up in Kuwait and Lebanon. He was educated in England and America, and has an engineering degree from UCLA and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He is the author of the novels Koolaids and I, the Divine, the story collection The Perv and, most recently, The Hakawati. He was the recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship in 2002. He divides his time between San Francisco and Beirut.

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Ha Jin

Ha Jin was born in Liaoning, China, in 1956, and moved to America in 1984. His books include Waiting, winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the National Book Award; War Trash, which won the PEN/Faulkner Award; Under the Red Flag, which won the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction; and Ocean of Words, which won the PEN/Hemingway Award. A new collection of stories, A Good Fall, was published in November 2009. He is a professor of English at Boston University.

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A.L. Kennedy

A.L. Kennedy is the author of novels, short stories and nonfiction. Her novel Everything You Need (Vintage) and a non-fiction book On Bullfighting (Yellow Jersey Press/ Anchor Books) were published in 1999. She was one of Granta’s Best Young British Novelists in 1993.

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Yiyun Li

Yiyun Li is the author of A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, The Vagrants and Gold Boy, Emerald Girl. Her most recent novel is Kinder Than Solitude. She lives in California.

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Rajesh Parameswaran

Rajesh Parameswaran’s stories have appeared in Granta, McSweeney’s, Zoetrope: All-Story, and Fiction. The ‘Strange Career of Dr. Raju Gopalarajan’ was one of three stories for which McSweeney’s earned a National Magazine Award in 2007, and it was reprinted in The Best American Magazine Writing. He lives in New York City.

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Robert Olen Butler

Robert Olen Butler was born in 1945. He is the author of twelve novels and six collections of stories, including a Good Scent from a Strange Mountain, which was awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

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Rawi Hage

Rawi Hage was born in Beirut and lived through nine years of the Lebanese civil war. He is a writer, a visual artist, and a curator, and he resides in Montreal. His photographs been shown in Canada, Colombia, Lebanon and Japan.

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Mirza Waheed

Novelist and journalist Mirza Waheed was born and brought up in Kashmir. His debut novel The Collaborator was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the Shakti Bhat Prize, and longlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize. It was also book of the year for The Telegraph, New Statesman, Financial Times, Business Standard and Telegraph India, among others. Waheed has written for the BBC, The Guardian and Al Jazeera English and the New York Times. His second novel, The Book of Gold Leaves, was shortlisted for the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2016. He lives in London.

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