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Salman Rushdie | Interview

Salman Rushdie & John Freeman

‘I'm not quite the same person as the ‘me’ about whom the book is written.’

Nicola Barker | Interview

Nicola Barker & Yuka Igarashi

‘I’ve always thought of myself as someone who writes outside of the dominant culture; an outsider looking in.’

Zadie Smith | Interview

Zadie Smith & Ted Hodgkinson

Zadie Smith on writing tighter sentences, the ‘essential hubris’ of criticism and why novelists prefer writing in their pyjamas.

Dina Nayeri | Interview

Dina Nayeri

‘I could shape a story before my mouth could shape the words.’

Florence Boyd | Interview

Florence Boyd & Ted Hodgkinson

‘There is a dichotomy of darkness and beauty within things that we can’t confront head on.’

Anthony Shadid | Interview

Anthony Shadid & Ted Hodgkinson

‘It’s very difficult to say what kind of Iraq is going to emerge from this trauma. I think we have to wait a generation.’

Karl Ove Knausgård | Interview

Karl Ove Knausgård & Sophia Efthimiatou

‘You are in the middle of your life and you think, how did I get here?’

Nathan Englander | Interview

Nathan Englander & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I don’t want to write any story that I think can be written.’

Ben Lerner | Interview

Ben Lerner & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I have no memory of intending to write a novel.’

Marcelo Ferroni | Interview

Marcelo Ferroni

‘This is an exciting moment for Brazilian literature. We may see a batch of new, vibrant novels, really soon.’

Léonie Hampton | Interview

Léonie Hampton & Yuka Igarashi

‘I see a dichotomy at play where I am trying to be truthful, but it’s hard to be direct.’

Adam Thirlwell | Interview

Adam Thirlwell & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I suppose it’s that word hyper that I was after: I was trying to find a form for a kind of hyper energy or anxiety.’

Rachel Seiffert | Podcast

Rachel Seiffert & Yuka Igarashi

Rachel Seiffert reads her work and talks to Granta about writing silences, the inescapability of history, the Troubles and learning to love her characters.

Paula Bohince | Interview

Paula Bohince & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I like the friction of fixed physical atmospheres with different lives passing through.’

Rowan Ricardo Phillips | Interview

Rowan Ricardo Phillips & Ted Hodgkinson

‘Poetry’s strongest response, on the other hand, is determined, open-ended world-making, which is the work of empathy.’

Emma Martin | Interview

Emma Martin

‘I’ve occasionally caught a kind of self-consciousness stalking me when I write about New Zealand.’

Diana McCaulay | Interview

Diana McCaulay

‘I want my writing to be grounded in the real and complex place, without nostalgia or idealization.’

Andrea Mullaney | Interview

Andrea Mullaney

‘To move past the ugly parts of history, you have to acknowledge them, on all sides, and this is what I think historical fiction can do so well: show how we got from there to here.’

Jekwu Anyaegbuna | Interview

Jekwu Anyaegbuna

‘I think it would be counterproductive for me to think too much about readers while producing a piece of fiction because the enjoyment of it varies from one person to another – and it’s impossible to satisfy everybody.’

Anushka Jasraj | Interview

Anushka Jasraj

‘I’ve never really had any readership, apart from fellow writers who have been forced to read my stories in writing workshops.’

Ian Teh | Interview

Ian Teh & Ted Hodgkinson

‘The pictures I take are fly-on-the-wall and open to interpretation.’

Tania James | Interview

Tania James & Saskia Vogel

‘Write the story that unsettles and excites you, that keeps you coming back to your desk.’

Nick Papadimitriou | Interview

Nick Papadimitriou & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I found that the torrent of inner voices I habitually heard began to organise itself in relation to the landscapes I passed through, the things I saw.’

Granta Italy 3 | Interview

Paolo Zaninoni & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I do not feel our authors set out to reflect their age or their epoch: they are not into literature as sociology.’

Rajesh Parameswaran | Interview

Rajesh Parameswaran & Yuka Igarashi

‘I could tell you that love and violence are basic forces interwoven through all of nature and human affairs, and that’s why I mix the two.’

Catherine Chung | Interview

Catherine Chung & Patrick Ryan

‘I think that my appreciation of what’s considered beautiful or elegant in math definitely carried over into what I appreciate in other fields as well. ’

Edmund White | Interview

Edmund White & Patrick Ryan

‘Although I was trying for the big-city and suburban realism of Yates, I didn’t mind adding a bit of fairy dust in the dialogue.’

Hari Kunzru | Interview

Hari Kunzru & Ted Hodgkinson

‘It was interesting to me how readily UFOs can be mapped onto a spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky and so on.’

Chinelo Okparanta | Interview

Chinelo Okparanta & Yuka Igarashi

‘I wanted to be sure to approach their resistance to Nnenna’s homosexuality from a practical perspective – one of fear, rather than one of hate.’

Letters From Two Exit Strategists

Jacob Newberry & Vanessa Manko

‘I feel like I’ll spend a great many years unravelling whatever is being stored inside of me just now.’

Juan Pablo Villalobos | Interview

Juan Pablo Villalobos & Rosalind Harvey

‘I’m not interested in ‘transparent’ or ‘objective’ narrators, I’m just looking for gripping fictional voices.’

Don DeLillo | Interview

Don DeLillo & Yuka Igarashi

‘The stories are representative of one slice of mind. The novels are mind, body, day and night, and what I ate for lunch.’

Granta Italy Sex | Interview

Paolo Zaninoni & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I think that the metaphor of bodily failure is a very apt one to reflect the feeling of weakness and despondency palpable today within the Italian society.’

Nick Dybek | Interview

Nick Dybek & Ted Hodgkinson

‘Maybe it’s what draws so many writers to the adolescent perspective; during that time, imagination and experience are in a death match.’

Peter Orner | Interview

Peter Orner & Ted Hodgkinson

‘For me the strange moments that make up our lives are plot.’