Granta | The Magazine of New Writing

Explore interviews

Filter

Granta Sweden | Interview

Johanna Haegerström & Saskia Vogel

‘If there are any tensions between Swedish writers it has more to do with style: writers who incline towards a more classical, epic storytelling versus writers who engage in more experimental uses of language.’

A.M. Homes | Interview

A.M. Homes & Yuka Igarashi

‘I don’t want to make suffering a positive (or negative); I very much want to acknowledge it without judgment.’

Steven Hall | Podcast

Steven Hall & Ted Hodgkinson

Steven Hall on the internet, writing from memory and Ian the Cat.

Zoë Meager | Interview

Zoë Meager

‘I haven’t written much local stuff, because I guess I’ve been more interested in the meeting of (potential) worlds.’

Michael Mendis | Interview

Michael Mendis

‘Mostly, writing is part of my process of understanding the world.’

Julian Jackson | Interview

Julian Jackson

‘I don’t have a short answer to where I am from – but perhaps that lack of ‘place’ influences my writing voice.’

Sharon Millar | Interview

Sharon Millar

‘Writing allows me to go below the surface and pull up the things that can’t be articulated in any other form.’

Eliza Robertson | Interview

Eliza Robertson

‘I suppose if something moves me to write, I don't question it.’

Granta Portugal | Interview

Carlos Vaz Marques & Ted Hodgkinson

‘We’ve kept the issue a secret because our goal was to offer a genuine feeling of discovery to Granta Portugal’s subscribers.’

Adam Thirlwell | Podcast

Adam Thirlwell & Yuka Igarashi

Adam Thirlwell speaks to Granta’s Yuka Igarashi about sex, history, translation, using tempo in novels and how his writing has evolved over the past decade.

Andrew O’Hagan | Interview

Andrew O’Hagan & Patrick Ryan

‘A lot of journalism was in danger of becoming ‘celebrity writing’, in the sense that the writer and his conscience could become the story.’

Chloe Aridjis | Interview

Chloe Aridjis & Ted Hodgkinson

‘What really struck me was the way the Suffragettes were pathologized, and the way women who took a political stance were deemed ‘hysterical’ in some way.’

Evie Wyld | Podcast

Evie Wyld & Ted Hodgkinson

Evie Wyld talks to online editor Ted Hodgkinson about why living in Peckham makes it easier to write about rural Australia, how memory informs her stories and why she can’t write a novel without at least one shark in it.

Turkish Granta | Interview

Berrak Gocer & Ted Hodgkinson

‘The writings, when they came together, made it very clear that there will always be a new approach to the issue of identity.’

Al Alvarez | Interview

Al Alvarez & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I think anything is good for you that makes you laugh.’

NoViolet Bulawayo | Interview

NoViolet Bulawayo

‘My love affair with books had turned into a marriage.’

David McConnell | Interview

David McConnell & Patrick Ryan

‘These were deranged acts but they were ultimately based on something that’s historically been treated as a social good, the sense of personal honour.’

Lillian Li | Interview

Lillian Li

‘I don’t think I ever learned how to tell a story in the literal sense.’

Dan Rhodes | Interview

Dan Rhodes & Ted Hodgkinson

‘My work tends to be about people who struggle to understand what’s going on around them. I can’t think why that would be.’

Eric Anderson and Sean Borodale In Conversation

Eric Anderson & Sean Borodale

‘The incendiary elements that start my poems are often something I find shocking, but hopefully not gratuitous.’

Elias Khoury | Interview

Sophia Efthimiatou & Elias Khoury

‘As the reader follows her in and out of consciousness, her history unravels and entwines with religious and social myths, and Lebanese folklore.’

Granta Norway | Interview

Trude Rønnestad & Ted Hodgkinson

‘To an extent I have tried to make the issue span the full spectrum of Norwegian literature.’

Howard Goldblatt | Interview

Howard Goldblatt & Sophia Efthimiatou

‘Humour, jokes, puns – those are indeed untranslatable.’

Mo Yan | Interview

Mo Yan & John Freeman

‘My life is more current, more contemporary and the cutting throat cruelty of our contemporary times limits the romance that I once felt.’

Victor LaValle | Interview

Victor LaValle & John Freeman

‘Our battle is between those trapped inside the institutions of modern American life (our economic and political systems in particular) and those who manipulate such institutions for their own profit.’

Han Dong | Interview

Han Dong & Philip Hand

‘Inflaming readers isn’t a good thing; I want to entice them.’

Salman Rushdie | Interview

Salman Rushdie & John Freeman

‘I'm not quite the same person as the ‘me’ about whom the book is written.’

Nicola Barker | Interview

Nicola Barker & Yuka Igarashi

‘I’ve always thought of myself as someone who writes outside of the dominant culture; an outsider looking in.’

Zadie Smith | Interview

Zadie Smith & Ted Hodgkinson

Zadie Smith on writing tighter sentences, the ‘essential hubris’ of criticism and why novelists prefer writing in their pyjamas.

Interview: Henry Marsh

Henry Marsh

Where did you learn to tell a story? Until adolescence I read Grimms’ Fairy Tales,...

Dina Nayeri | Interview

Dina Nayeri

‘I could shape a story before my mouth could shape the words.’

Florence Boyd | Interview

Florence Boyd & Ted Hodgkinson

‘There is a dichotomy of darkness and beauty within things that we can’t confront head on.’

Anthony Shadid | Interview

Anthony Shadid & Ted Hodgkinson

‘It’s very difficult to say what kind of Iraq is going to emerge from this trauma. I think we have to wait a generation.’

Karl Ove Knausgård | Interview

Karl Ove Knausgård & Sophia Efthimiatou

‘You are in the middle of your life and you think, how did I get here?’

Nathan Englander | Interview

Nathan Englander & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I don’t want to write any story that I think can be written.’