One More Year | Granta

One More Year

Sana Krasikov

The protagonists of Sana Krasikov’s indelible stories are mostly women – some of them are new to America; some still live in the former Soviet Union, in Georgia or Russia; and some have returned to Russia to find a country they barely recognize and people they no longer understand. Mothers leave children behind; children abandon their parents. Almost all of them look to love to repair their lives, and when love isn’t really there, they attempt to make do with a paler, lighter imitation of it, with substitutes for love.

  • Published: 03/05/2010
  • Paperback
  • ISBN: 9781846271786
  • 129x20mm, 256 pages

Sana Krasikov is a brilliant new writer. The stories of One More Year are populated by imperfect characters who always surprise, and who are gloriously brought to life with humor, sympathy, and unexpected tenderness

Khaled Hosseini, author of THE KITE RUNNER and A THOUSAND SPLENDID SUNS

With great tenderness Krasikov reminds us that the immigrant cannot leave their personality behind when they leave the old country; and, these days, the immigrant cannot leave their family, either. I can't think when I've read a writer who has more effectively and subtly portrayed the relief and torture that the age of the cheap intercontinental phone call has brought. In Krasikov's hands, even committing to love and be loved can be an act of emigration

James Meek, author of THE PEOPLE'S ACT OF LOVE

The debut of a major literary voice shaped by the literary traditions of both America and Russia

Yiyun Li, Guardian Prize-winning author of A THOUSAND YEARS OF GOOD PRAYERS

The Author

Sana Krasikov is the author of ‘The Patriots’ (Jan 2017), and ‘One More Year’, which was named a named a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, The New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award, and received a National Book Foundation’s “5 under 35” Award, and the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Her fiction has been published in The New Yorker and The Atlantic and other magazines. For more detailed info, there’s my website (finally done): sanakrasikov.com

More about the author →

From the Same Author

The Patriots

‘A sweeping, colourful read’ Mail on Sunday

Lose yourself in the irresistable story of one woman’s journey through 20th-century Russia.

Growing up in 1930s Brooklyn, Florence Fein will do anything to escape the confining values of her family and her city, and create a life of meaning and consequence. When a new job and a love affair lead her to Moscow, she doesn’t think twice about abandoning America – only to discover, years later, that America has abandoned her.

Now, as her son Julian travels back to Moscow – entrusted to stitch together a murky transcontinental oil deal – he must dig into Florence’s past to discover who his mother really was and what she became. He must also persuade his own son, Lenny, to abandon his risky quest for prosperity in the cut-throat Russian marketplace. As he traces a thread from Depression-era America, through the collective housing and work camps of Stalin’s USSR, to the glittering, oil-rich world of New Russia, Julian finally begins to understand the role he has played – as a father, and as a son.

Epic in sweep and intimate in detail, The Patriots is both a compelling portrait of the entangled relationship between America and Russia, and a beautifully crafted story of three generations of one family caught between the forces of history and the consequences of past choices.

Sana Krasikov on Granta.com

Fiction | Granta 139

Remembering Westgate

Sana Krasikov

‘I wonder if the only way to grasp what is terrifying and unimaginable for those of us who haven’t experienced it is to feel around the contours of inescapability, the boundary of its negative space.’

In Conversation | Granta 139

Sana Krasikov and Viv Groskop In Conversation

Sana Krasikov & Viv Groskop

Sana Krasikov and Viv Groskop discuss the Soviet experience, the rise of mass cynicism and the politics of Russia and the US today.

Fiction | Granta 139

Qualitative Leaps

Sana Krasikov

‘Breaking your family’s heart was the price you paid for rescuing your own.’