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Eliza Robertson | Interview

Eliza Robertson

‘I suppose if something moves me to write, I don't question it.’

Granta Portugal | Interview

Carlos Vaz Marques & Ted Hodgkinson

‘We’ve kept the issue a secret because our goal was to offer a genuine feeling of discovery to Granta Portugal’s subscribers.’

Adam Thirlwell | Podcast

Adam Thirlwell & Yuka Igarashi

Adam Thirlwell speaks to Granta’s Yuka Igarashi about sex, history, translation, using tempo in novels and how his writing has evolved over the past decade.

Andrew O’Hagan | Interview

Andrew O’Hagan & Patrick Ryan

‘A lot of journalism was in danger of becoming ‘celebrity writing’, in the sense that the writer and his conscience could become the story.’

Chloe Aridjis | Interview

Chloe Aridjis & Ted Hodgkinson

‘What really struck me was the way the Suffragettes were pathologized, and the way women who took a political stance were deemed ‘hysterical’ in some way.’

Evie Wyld | Podcast

Evie Wyld & Ted Hodgkinson

Evie Wyld talks to online editor Ted Hodgkinson about why living in Peckham makes it easier to write about rural Australia, how memory informs her stories and why she can’t write a novel without at least one shark in it.

Turkish Granta | Interview

Berrak Gocer & Ted Hodgkinson

‘The writings, when they came together, made it very clear that there will always be a new approach to the issue of identity.’

Al Alvarez | Interview

Al Alvarez & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I think anything is good for you that makes you laugh.’

NoViolet Bulawayo | Interview

NoViolet Bulawayo

‘My love affair with books had turned into a marriage.’

David McConnell | Interview

David McConnell & Patrick Ryan

‘These were deranged acts but they were ultimately based on something that’s historically been treated as a social good, the sense of personal honour.’

Lillian Li | Interview

Lillian Li

‘I don’t think I ever learned how to tell a story in the literal sense.’

Dan Rhodes | Interview

Dan Rhodes & Ted Hodgkinson

‘My work tends to be about people who struggle to understand what’s going on around them. I can’t think why that would be.’

Eric Anderson and Sean Borodale In Conversation

Eric Anderson & Sean Borodale

‘The incendiary elements that start my poems are often something I find shocking, but hopefully not gratuitous.’