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Daniyal Mueenuddin | Interview

Daniyal Mueenuddin

‘Great translations are much rarer than great works of fiction or poetry.’

David Godine | Interview

Eric Burns

‘David R. Godine is a respected, adventurous, outspoken publisher and a soi-disant cultural elitist.’

David Guterson | Interview

David Guterson & John Freeman

‘Hubris, power, sex, ambition, frailty, pathos, descent, castigation: there but for the grace of gods go I, and as long as it isn’t me, great!’

David Heatley | Interview

David Heatley & Simon Willis

‘There’s something magical about a pictographic doodle that’s simple enough to scan and then move on.’

David McConnell | Interview

David McConnell & Patrick Ryan

‘These were deranged acts but they were ultimately based on something that’s historically been treated as a social good, the sense of personal honour.’

Diana McCaulay | Interview

Diana McCaulay

‘I want my writing to be grounded in the real and complex place, without nostalgia or idealization.’

Dina Nayeri | Interview

Dina Nayeri

‘I could shape a story before my mouth could shape the words.’

Dinaw Mengestu | Interview

Dinaw Mengestu

Dinaw Mengestu talks about how he came to write ‘Big Money’, his contribution to Granta 108, his forthcoming novel, his relationship with his hometown, Chicago, and his inspiration as a writer.

Don DeLillo | Interview

Don DeLillo & Yuka Igarashi

‘The stories are representative of one slice of mind. The novels are mind, body, day and night, and what I ate for lunch.’

Edmund White | Interview

Edmund White & Patrick Ryan

‘Although I was trying for the big-city and suburban realism of Yates, I didn’t mind adding a bit of fairy dust in the dialogue.’

Edwidge Danticat | Interview

Edwidge Danticat & Ellah Allfrey

‘I am a writer who is shaped by everything that I have experienced and loved, including Haiti.’

Eleanor Catton | Interview

Eleanor Catton

Eleanor Catton, author of the critically acclaimed, Betty Trask-award-winning debut novel, The Rehearsal, talks to Granta.

Elias Khoury | Interview

Sophia Efthimiatou & Elias Khoury

‘As the reader follows her in and out of consciousness, her history unravels and entwines with religious and social myths, and Lebanese folklore.’

Eliza Robertson | Interview

Eliza Robertson

‘I suppose if something moves me to write, I don't question it.’

Elizabeth McCracken | Interview

Elizabeth McCracken

‘This week John Freeman spoke to Best Young American Novelist Elizabeth McCracken about her works-in-progress, a novel that broke up into six short stories, and her contribution to Granta’s latest issue.’

Ellen Bryant Voigt | Interview

Ellen Bryant Voigt & Rachael Allen

‘I don’t think of music and narrative as being mutually exclusive – some of my poems ARE narrative, and are as ‘sound-driven’ as the lyrics.’

Emily Berry | Interview

Emily Berry & Rachael Allen

‘I’m not even very comfortable being defined as a female poet. You never hear about ‘male poets’.’

Emma Martin | Interview

Emma Martin

‘I’ve occasionally caught a kind of self-consciousness stalking me when I write about New Zealand.’

Eric Anderson and Sean Borodale In Conversation

Eric Anderson & Sean Borodale

‘The incendiary elements that start my poems are often something I find shocking, but hopefully not gratuitous.’

Erin McMillan | Interview

Erin McMillan & Roy Robins

‘The other important component of the why of writing is that I’ve always been a bit of a liar.’

Evan James Roskos | Interview

Evan James Roskos & Roy Robins

‘There is a view of American men presented by the media – of men as boorish, insensitive, emotionally immature – that manages to underscore various stereotypes that I feel fiction and poetry have a duty to dismantle.’

Evie Wyld | Interview

Evie Wyld & Roy Robins

‘When I was at school I found I received the same satisfaction from writing a short story that I did doing awful self-portraits – only the results were much better.’

Evie Wyld | Podcast

Evie Wyld & Ted Hodgkinson

Evie Wyld talks to online editor Ted Hodgkinson about why living in Peckham makes it easier to write about rural Australia, how memory informs her stories and why she can’t write a novel without at least one shark in it.

Florence Boyd | Interview

Florence Boyd & Ted Hodgkinson

‘There is a dichotomy of darkness and beauty within things that we can’t confront head on.’

Gary Shteyngart | Interview

Gary Shteyngart & Emily Greenhouse

‘I can’t even afford to have thoughts on London, much less live or visit there.’

Gordon Burn | Interview

Gordon Burn & Simon Willis

‘The line between reality and its representation has become rivetingly porous.’

Granta Italy 3 | Interview

Paolo Zaninoni & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I do not feel our authors set out to reflect their age or their epoch: they are not into literature as sociology.’

Granta Italy Sex | Interview

Paolo Zaninoni & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I think that the metaphor of bodily failure is a very apt one to reflect the feeling of weakness and despondency palpable today within the Italian society.’

Granta Norway | Interview

Trude Rønnestad & Ted Hodgkinson

‘To an extent I have tried to make the issue span the full spectrum of Norwegian literature.’

Granta Portugal | Interview

Carlos Vaz Marques & Ted Hodgkinson

‘We’ve kept the issue a secret because our goal was to offer a genuine feeling of discovery to Granta Portugal’s subscribers.’

Granta Sweden | Interview

Johanna Haegerström & Saskia Vogel

‘If there are any tensions between Swedish writers it has more to do with style: writers who incline towards a more classical, epic storytelling versus writers who engage in more experimental uses of language.’

Ha Jin | Interview

Ha Jin & Helen Gordon

‘My reason for writing in English is twofold: to separate my existence from the state power of China and to preserve the integrity of my work.’

Han Dong | Interview

Han Dong & Philip Hand

‘Inflaming readers isn’t a good thing; I want to entice them.’

Hannah Gersen | Interview

Hannah Gersen & Roy Robins

‘It’s very satisfying to write short stories because it can be a kind of game — to see how much can be revealed with just a few thousand words.’