Granta | The Home of New Writing

Explore Fiction

The Online Edition

Beetle

Joanna Kavenna

An excerpt from ZED, the forthcoming novel by Joanna Kavenna, a Granta Best of Young British Novelist.

Granta 118

God Bless You, 2011

Hiromi Kawakami

‘If the god of uranium really exists, then what must he be thinking? Were this a fairy tale of old, what would happen when humans broke the laws of nature to turn gods into minions?’ Hiromi Kawakami on the nature gods of Japan.

Granta 118

The Moon and the Batteries

Hiromi Kawakami

‘His full name was Mr Harutsuna Matsumoto, but I called him ‘Sensei’. Not ‘Mr’ or ‘Sir’, just ‘Sensei’.’

Granta 132

About Her and the Memories That Belong to Her

Mieko Kawakami

‘If I were to forget, then it would be the same as it never having existed at all.’

The Online Edition

How Much Heart

Mieko Kawakami

A triptych of flash fiction by Mieko Kawakami, translated from the Japanese by David Boyd.

The Online Edition

Parfait

Hiromi Kawakami

‘He comes all the way here after he died and the two of you are making small talk?’ New fiction by Hiromi Kawakami, translated from the Japanese by Allison Markin Powell

Granta 75

In Between Talking about The Elephant

Jackie Kay

‘I discover some rough skin on her elbow. I run my tongue along it’.

Granta 98

The Last of The Smokers

Jackie Kay

‘Smoking is my first erotic memory.’

Granta 85

You Go When You Can No Longer Stay

Jackie Kay

‘It is not so much that we are splitting up that is really worrying me, it is the fact that she keeps quoting Martin Amis.’

Granta 107

Reality, Reality

Jackie Kay

‘Now that – that is bursting with flavour.’

Granta 95

Safe

Claire Keegan

‘Don't forget to write.’

Granta 84

Man Walks Into A Bar

James Kelman

‘I had been living abroad for twelve years and I was gaun hame, maybe forever, maybe a month.‘

The Online Edition

Homeland

Walter Kempowski

‘I was suckled by Mother Earth, he would reflect on occasion, and he would stretch, feeling new strength in his veins.’

Granta 137

The Transition

Luke Kennard

In the not-so-distant future, middle-class underachievers are faced with a difficult choice: prison or motivational business classes.