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Abscessed Tooth

Debra Gwartney

‘Silence allows me to pretend that this happened to someone else a long time ago, and not to me.’

Cumbrian Fell Pony

Sarah Hall

Sarah Hall writes about the Cumbrian fell pony for Granta 142: Animalia.

Above the Tree Line

Teva Harrison

Teva Harrison visits and illustrates the Northwest Passage through the Canadian arctic for Granta 141: Canada

To the Castle and Back

Václav Havel

‘I am announcing that I have returned from the USA. I thank all of those who worked in the domestic resistance. Likewise I thank all of us who worked in the foreign resistance.’

Addressing Mental Health Through Reading Well

Debbie Hicks

‘Reading Well is more than just a booklist – it represents the power of reading to change lives.’

The Munduruku People Against Brazil

Tiffany Higgins

‘The Middle Tapajós Munduruku are not alone. Indigenous and traditional communities throughout the Tapajós River basin are facing increased degradation of their environment and the cultural sustenance practices that form the foundation of their lifeways.’

The one/many problem

Daisy Hildyard

‘Other creatures literally stop me breathing. There are so many of them, and only one of me.’ Daisy Hildyard writes about her research into the animal kingdom.

When Poets Write Novels

Caoilinn Hughes

Caoilinn Hughes on the ten best novels written by poets.

Han Suyin: A Friendship

Aamer Hussein

'Han Suyin, elegant postcolonial diva avant la lettre, icon of the new, nonaligned Asia, thorn in the side of the dying British Empire and the American Right.'

Climb the Mountains

Apricot Irving

'Harm that comes through the hands of those we love must be wrestled with; it does not simply disappear.'

Cormac James | Notes on Craft

Cormac James

‘My most recent writing lesson came from Elizabeth Strout, a few months ago. Pay attention, is all she taught me, and it was plenty.’

Broken Animals

Britta Jaschinski

‘These bored, frustrated and hungry animals appear as reluctant figures in some unsolvable puzzle, or as victims of a grand experiment whose original purpose is lost in time.’

Kestrel

Cynan Jones

‘A kestrel is not domestic. The one time I tried affection the bird put his beak through my lip.’

A Mischief of Rats

Joanna Kavenna

‘They slept curled together in a hammock, little scraps of fur, hearts beating madly.’ Joanna Kavenna on her pet rats, Kat Bjelland and Courtney Love.

The Bible As Literature, Literature As Scripture

Stuart Kelly

'Literature and literary criticism took me away from the Church as a teenager, and literature and literary criticism brought me back to it later.'

Notebooks

Amitava Kumar

‘I wanted sex as my subject, not only the innocence but also the bruising.’

Abuse, Silence, and the Light That Virginia Woolf Switched On

April Ayers Lawson

When Virginia Woolf was thirteen, she was abused by her half-brother George Duckworth. No one believed her - not even her biographers. April Ayers Lawson on Woolf's abuse, and her own.

After

April Ayers Lawson

‘I again told him I wasn’t ready to have sex, and his only response was to lean in and kiss me. The hallway in which we walked seemed to be shrinking, closing in on us.’ – April Ayers Lawson on intimacy after sexual abuse.

A Not-So-Pretty History of Pet Care

Daniel Magariel

‘One day after the next I would figure out what was needed, learn from my mistakes, pay attention to what worked.’

Heart Berries

Terese Marie Mailhot

‘We started the affair in a small booth at Village Inn. I didn’t sleep the night before. You were my teacher, and we discussed my fiction.’

The Great Israeli novel of War and Doubt

Anne Meadows

Granta editor Anne Meadows writes about Khirbet Khizeh, the great Israeli novel of war and doubt.

Terminus

Pedro Rosa Mendes

‘We hope that the copilot knows the terrain well. That his mask of youth conceals the face of a seasoned veteran of war. That he knows the minefields because he helped plant them.’

Equal Recognition | Discoveries

Josie Mitchell

In an article for the LA Review of Books, Deborah Smith discusses the politics of literary translation and the backlash she received after winning the Man Booker International Prize.

Lisa Moore | Notes on Craft

Lisa Moore

‘I wanted to explore what a “likeness” is, and how the act of capturing a person through a portrait might compare to writing a character.’

Court

Blake Morrison

‘One by one they’re led into the box. They swear their oath. They confirm their name, their employment, why they were where they say they were, what it was they saw.’

Masculinity Is Leaving The Male Body

Seabright D. Mortimer

‘If we’re gonna imagine this beautiful queer paradise what form does a man take?’ – Seabright D. Mortimer on constructing masculine identity in genderqueer spaces.

Jailbait

Ottessa Moshfegh

‘Part of what made him interesting was that I felt he would dismiss me the moment I bored him.’

Large Black Rooster

Daniyal Mueenuddin

‘Early one morning in the month of June, someone ran over a huge black rooster on County Road W in Wisconsin hill country.’

See What You Do to Me

TaraShea Nesbit

‘My intention was to protect myself, and not to have to go back on my word.’

On Paris Hilton and Other Undead Things

Brittany Newell

‘What sex tapes offer, on a hauntological level, is an impossible closeness to that which is neither dead nor alive.’

Cows

Adam Nicolson

‘All in it together but not in it together at all.’

Moose Magic

Téa Obreht

Téa Obreht on a chance encounter with a moose in Wyoming, for Granta 142: Animalia

Fred Pearce | Notes on Craft

Fred Pearce

‘For a hack like me, book-length meta-journalism is both a luxury and a challenge. I cannot hide my own views over 100,000 words, even if I want to.’

Africa Writes

Caitlin Pearson

The Royal African Society takes a look back at the history of the Africa Writes festival, their annual celebration of contemporary literature from Africa and the diaspora.

Rocky Raccoon

DBC Pierre

‘The mask said everything. This was a thief. A schemer and a thief.’

Pay for Your Words

Peter Pomerantsev

Peter Pomerantsev downloads his Facebook data. ‘We seem to be caught in a trap: the more we use a word, the more we will be charged for it.’