Granta | The Magazine of New Writing

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A Summer’s Evening in Beijing

Elizabeth Pisani

‘The air is light with the intoxicating fumes of impending martyrdom.’

The River Potudan

Andrei Platonov

‘Grass had grown back on the trodden-down dirt tracks of the civil war, because the war had stopped.’

The Migration

Edward Platt

‘It was like stepping into the interior of a submarine.’

Impotence

Norman Podhoretz

‘As a result of Vietnam, the Pentagon has grown extremely gun-shy. These days it is virtually pacifist: it buys a lot of weapons, but doesn't really like the idea of using them.’

Republicans

James Pogue

‘This American says he’s heard of Cross but that he’s still just passing through.’ He laughed and formed the shape of a pistol with his right hand. ‘Well you heard that part, didn’t ya? That is one thing that will never change here.’

The White Bloc

James Pogue

‘This election made clear that white people in this country have begun to vote how Southern whites always have: as a bloc.’

Best Book of 1950: A Natural History of Trees by Donald Culross Peattie

James Pogue

‘Now more than ever environmentalists need to remember what it’s like to write for that real world.’

Possession

Bella Pollen

‘The brain is a bureaucratic organ with an almost neurotic determination to balance its books. To account to the department of logic for terror, it calls on the office of imagination to conjure up a worthy vision.’

Tommy

Donald Ray Pollock

‘I began working at the Mead Paper Company in Chillicothe, Ohio, in the summer of 1973.’

The Problem Outside

Linda Polman

‘About 150,000 refugees, standing shoulder to shoulder on a mountain plateau the size of three football fields‘.

Propagandalands

Peter Pomerantsev

Peter Pomerantsev’s anti-travelogue on Putin’s Russia, Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible, has won the 2016 Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize.

Why We’re Post-Fact

Peter Pomerantsev

‘We are living in a ‘post-fact’ or ‘post-truth’ world. Not merely a world where politicians and media lie – they have always lied – but one where they don’t care whether they tell the truth or not.’

The False Lords of Misrule

Peter Pomerantsev

Peter Pomerantsev takes us on a tour of the lewd, crude language of modern politics – from Trump to Putin to Duterte, Milo Yianopoulos, Boris Johnson and more.

Pop-Up People

Peter Pomerantsev

We are living through a period of pop-up populism, where each political movement redefines ‘the Many’ and ‘the People’, where we are always reconsidering who counts as an ‘insider’ or an ‘outsider’, where what it means to belong is never certain.

Pay for Your Words

Peter Pomerantsev

Peter Pomerantsev downloads his Facebook data. ‘We seem to be caught in a trap: the more we use a word, the more we will be charged for it.’

The Fixer

Snigdha Poonam

‘In Indian media and advertising, young people are mainly being projected as vessels of breathless aspiration.’

The Cult of the Hindu Cowboy

Snigdha Poonam

‘The Hindu cowboy accords to the cow the holiest status in his imagination: of mother. It is his duty to protect her honour; it is his privilege to kill for her.’

The Man Who Lived

Snigdha Poonam

Snigdha Poonam on how WhatsApp is being used to encourage mob violence in India.

Rosalind Porter | What I’m Reading

Rosalind Porter

‘Despite the difficulties booksellers have selling the stuff, the short story isn’t going to disappear anytime soon.’

Brother | State of Mind

Max Porter

‘We don’t often talk seriously or in depth about our childhood these days, but we know we could, and we know what good it did us.’

Vision

Susan Power

‘I am the unlikely interlacing of two families who never thought their histories would braid together.’

After Silk Road

Mike Power

‘The Dark Web is a shadow internet, an unindexed, unseen and lawless corner of cyberspace.’

The Seventh Event

Richard Powers

‘Think of mitosis as trillions of slightly near-sighted, plagiarizing students’

Soaked

Richard Powers

‘You’ll have heard how the city once ended in fire’

Best Book of 1970: Moominvalley in November

Aleksi Pöyry

‘This is a book I always return to for its melancholy tone, warm humour and psychological insight.’

Teeth

Giorgio Pressburger

‘One day in January a tall thin man with long white hair came into our courtyard. He was draped in a green cloak, torn in various places.’

Niagara

Frederic Prokosch

‘Thomas Wolfe's enormous body and low, grumbling voice made the cutlery look like trinkets in a brittle Lilliput.’

Other Women

Francine Prose

‘Feminism is as basic to my sense of self as the fact that I have brown eyes.’

Downton Delirium

Francine Prose

‘Anglophilia is constantly thrumming on, or just under, the surface of our culture.’

Chère Madame

Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust’s letters to his neighbour, translated from the French by Lydia Davis.

Ten Books that Changed the World

Martin Puchner

Martin Puchner on ten books that have changed the course of world history.

Murasaki’s Paper Trail

Martin Puchner

Martin Puchner on how Murasaki Shikibu, a lady-in-waiting at the Japanese court, manage to write the first great novel of world literature.

The Myth of Creative Genius

Natasha Pulley

‘There’s a mysticism that surrounds writing fiction.’

Medtner

Philip Pullman

‘It feels like being a child in a room where adults are having a deep and passionate conversation about important things’

Second Nature

Jonathan Raban

‘Man is a visitor who does not remain.’