Granta | The Magazine of New Writing

Explore

Filter

Best Book of 1982: Dictee by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha

Eleanor Chandler

‘While the terrible pain of speech is made clear, this book ultimately reminds us that we must not be silenced.’

Best Book of 1971: Malina by Ingeborg Bachmann

Kevin Breathnach

‘The novel submits to an internalized discipline: it is an observation machine’

Best Book of 2008: To the End of the Land, by David Grossman

Lily Dunn

‘David Grossman is a writer who speaks to the heart, and this is his masterpiece.’

Sweet William: A Memoir of Old Horse, by John Hawkes | Best Book of 1993

Linda H. Davis

‘Plunged inside the skin of the horse, I felt his sensory burdens, sufferings and fears: his keen sensitivity to sound, smell and touch (even the weight of a saddle)’

Best Book of 1943: ­Love In A Fallen City­ by Eileen Chang

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan

‘Eileen Chang writes perfectly for the romantic in an unromantic and unrelenting world.’

The Best Books of Any Year: Three Variations on Post-Truth

Astrid Alben

‘2016 is almost over but the impact of this year’s political events will reverberate around the globe for decades.’

Best Book of 1991: Mao II by Don DeLillo

Colin Barrett

‘The ultimate goal of each act of art, each work of terror, is to demolish the old, incumbent reality, and create a new one.’

When Denmark Criminalised Kindness

Lisbeth Zornig Andersen

‘We now know that it is a criminal offence to help refugees in distress.’

Traffic

Rae Armantrout

‘Music needs silence / more than silence needs music.’ New poetry by Rae Armantrout.

Fly

Feng Sun Chen

‘Every day, I see a monstrosity in the kissing hole.’

Diary of a Gulag Prison Guard

Ivan Chistyakov

‘Freedom, even with hunger and cold, is still precious and irreplaceable.’

Enjaracon Sponaeda

Will Alexander

‘how can all the pressures of surveillance / fail to describe me?’

Open After My Death

Linda H. Davis

‘I had become the kind of parent I never wanted to be.’

Protest

Various Artists

Protest is an exhibition of historical and contemporary works by sixteen artists concerned with the sociopolitical issues of their day.

Wendy

Ka Bradley

‘Nathan: there’s something in the basement. In the locked rooms I was telling you about.’

Our Last Guest

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan

‘Maybe anyone becomes unbearable after enough time in the honeymoon suite.’ Rowan Hisayo Buchanan’s story of eternity á deux.

Granta Reads: Angela Carter’s ‘Cousins’

Angela Carter

In this Halloween edition of the Granta podcast, Josie Mitchell reads Angela Carter’s 1980 short story, ‘Cousins’. The first in our Halloween series.

The Fog and the Sea

Lily Dunn

Lily Dunn on her father’s losing battle with alcoholism.

Mark Gevisser and Pwaangulongii Dauod In Conversation

Pwaangulongii Dauod

Mark Gevisser and Pwaangulongii Dauod discuss Africa’s LGBTI communities, an experience of violent sexual repression, and Afro-Modernity.

Astrid Alben In Conversation: Podcast

Astrid Alben

Astrid Alben discusses her work, the interdisciplinary journal Pars, and developing a poetic alter ego.

He Had His Reasons

Colin Barrett

Colin Barrett on the Hawe family murder-suicide, and what the Irish media’s coverage tells us about the nation’s prejudices.

The Good Citizens

Christy Edwall

‘In the black fog of her grief, Anna Kraft received an invitation.’

Sundial Tone

Garrett Caples

‘light plays on the planet / long enough to tell time’

The Threshold

Oliverio Coelho

‘In the not-too-distant future, all men would be on their feet, reduced to wearing out their soles on the streets.’

The Liar

James Tadd Adcox

‘I remember the first time I lied. It may be my earliest memory.’

Brexit Win

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

‘The poor hated the poor, natives hated outsiders, settled migrants hated new incomers, the North hated the South, non-Londoners hated London.’

The Politics of English Forgetfulness

Madeleine Bunting

‘Brexit demonstrates one of England’s most trusted strategies of power: deliberate forgetfulness.’

Free will and Brexit

Julian Baggini

‘Whether or not you think 23 June was a great day for Britain and Europe, it was a very bad one for freedom.’

Black Country

Anthony Cartwright

‘There’s a sense, I think, that what that X in the box translates as is seventeen and a half million voices that say, we’re still here.’

Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?

Kathleen Collins

‘It’s the year of “the human being”. The year of race-creed-color blindness. It’s 1963.’

Arcadia

Emma Cline

‘Could a place work on you like an illness?’

Is Fraid I Fraid Calendars

Vahni Capildeo

‘Haven’t you noticed people / are different since then?’

Potted Meat

Steven Dunn

‘My cousin is an artist. He says, You draw some good knives but you still need to work on your stab wounds.’

Diaries

Suzanne Brøgger

‘My habit of being a dreamer is filled with the joy of melancholy.’

Africa’s Future Has No Space for Stupid Black Men

Pwaangulongii Dauod

‘The night was full of energy. The kind of energy that Africa needs to reinvent itself.’

The Decay of Politics

Philip Ó Ceallaigh

‘Britain has made the control of borders and the free movement of people its central obsession, its fundamental national anxiety.’ Philip Ó Ceallaigh on Brexit.