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Howard Goldblatt | Interview

Howard Goldblatt & Sophia Efthimiatou

‘Humour, jokes, puns – those are indeed untranslatable.’

Mo Yan | Interview

Mo Yan & John Freeman

‘My life is more current, more contemporary and the cutting throat cruelty of our contemporary times limits the romance that I once felt.’

Victor LaValle | Interview

Victor LaValle & John Freeman

‘Our battle is between those trapped inside the institutions of modern American life (our economic and political systems in particular) and those who manipulate such institutions for their own profit.’

Han Dong | Interview

Han Dong & Philip Hand

‘Inflaming readers isn’t a good thing; I want to entice them.’

Salman Rushdie | Interview

Salman Rushdie & John Freeman

‘I'm not quite the same person as the ‘me’ about whom the book is written.’

Nicola Barker | Interview

Nicola Barker & Yuka Igarashi

‘I’ve always thought of myself as someone who writes outside of the dominant culture; an outsider looking in.’

Zadie Smith | Interview

Zadie Smith & Ted Hodgkinson

Zadie Smith on writing tighter sentences, the ‘essential hubris’ of criticism and why novelists prefer writing in their pyjamas.

Interview: Henry Marsh

Henry Marsh

Where did you learn to tell a story? Until adolescence I read Grimms’ Fairy Tales,...

Dina Nayeri | Interview

Dina Nayeri

‘I could shape a story before my mouth could shape the words.’

Florence Boyd | Interview

Florence Boyd & Ted Hodgkinson

‘There is a dichotomy of darkness and beauty within things that we can’t confront head on.’

Anthony Shadid | Interview

Anthony Shadid & Ted Hodgkinson

‘It’s very difficult to say what kind of Iraq is going to emerge from this trauma. I think we have to wait a generation.’

Karl Ove Knausgård | Interview

Karl Ove Knausgård & Sophia Efthimiatou

‘You are in the middle of your life and you think, how did I get here?’

Nathan Englander | Interview

Nathan Englander & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I don’t want to write any story that I think can be written.’

Ben Lerner | Interview

Ben Lerner & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I have no memory of intending to write a novel.’

Marcelo Ferroni | Interview

Marcelo Ferroni

‘This is an exciting moment for Brazilian literature. We may see a batch of new, vibrant novels, really soon.’

Léonie Hampton | Interview

Léonie Hampton & Yuka Igarashi

‘I see a dichotomy at play where I am trying to be truthful, but it’s hard to be direct.’

Adam Thirlwell | Interview

Adam Thirlwell & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I suppose it’s that word hyper that I was after: I was trying to find a form for a kind of hyper energy or anxiety.’

Rachel Seiffert | Podcast

Rachel Seiffert & Yuka Igarashi

Rachel Seiffert reads her work and talks to Granta about writing silences, the inescapability of history, the Troubles and learning to love her characters.

Paula Bohince | Interview

Paula Bohince & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I like the friction of fixed physical atmospheres with different lives passing through.’

Rowan Ricardo Phillips | Interview

Rowan Ricardo Phillips & Ted Hodgkinson

‘Poetry’s strongest response, on the other hand, is determined, open-ended world-making, which is the work of empathy.’

Emma Martin | Interview

Emma Martin

‘I’ve occasionally caught a kind of self-consciousness stalking me when I write about New Zealand.’

Diana McCaulay | Interview

Diana McCaulay

‘I want my writing to be grounded in the real and complex place, without nostalgia or idealization.’

Andrea Mullaney | Interview

Andrea Mullaney

‘To move past the ugly parts of history, you have to acknowledge them, on all sides, and this is what I think historical fiction can do so well: show how we got from there to here.’

Jekwu Anyaegbuna | Interview

Jekwu Anyaegbuna

‘I think it would be counterproductive for me to think too much about readers while producing a piece of fiction because the enjoyment of it varies from one person to another – and it’s impossible to satisfy everybody.’

Anushka Jasraj | Interview

Anushka Jasraj

‘I’ve never really had any readership, apart from fellow writers who have been forced to read my stories in writing workshops.’

Ian Teh | Interview

Ian Teh & Ted Hodgkinson

‘The pictures I take are fly-on-the-wall and open to interpretation.’

Tania James | Interview

Tania James & Saskia Vogel

‘Write the story that unsettles and excites you, that keeps you coming back to your desk.’

Nick Papadimitriou | Interview

Nick Papadimitriou & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I found that the torrent of inner voices I habitually heard began to organise itself in relation to the landscapes I passed through, the things I saw.’

Granta Italy 3 | Interview

Paolo Zaninoni & Ted Hodgkinson

‘I do not feel our authors set out to reflect their age or their epoch: they are not into literature as sociology.’

Rajesh Parameswaran | Interview

Rajesh Parameswaran & Yuka Igarashi

‘I could tell you that love and violence are basic forces interwoven through all of nature and human affairs, and that’s why I mix the two.’

Catherine Chung | Interview

Catherine Chung & Patrick Ryan

‘I think that my appreciation of what’s considered beautiful or elegant in math definitely carried over into what I appreciate in other fields as well. ’

Edmund White | Interview

Edmund White & Patrick Ryan

‘Although I was trying for the big-city and suburban realism of Yates, I didn’t mind adding a bit of fairy dust in the dialogue.’

Hari Kunzru | Interview

Hari Kunzru & Ted Hodgkinson

‘It was interesting to me how readily UFOs can be mapped onto a spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky and so on.’

Chinelo Okparanta | Interview

Chinelo Okparanta & Yuka Igarashi

‘I wanted to be sure to approach their resistance to Nnenna’s homosexuality from a practical perspective – one of fear, rather than one of hate.’

Letters From Two Exit Strategists

Jacob Newberry & Vanessa Manko

‘I feel like I’ll spend a great many years unravelling whatever is being stored inside of me just now.’

Juan Pablo Villalobos | Interview

Juan Pablo Villalobos & Rosalind Harvey

‘I’m not interested in ‘transparent’ or ‘objective’ narrators, I’m just looking for gripping fictional voices.’