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Armadillo Man

Julianne Pachico

‘The Armadillo Man is watching her. She gives him a good show – the best she has to offer.’

Mountains Don’t Know Borders

Lois Parshley

‘In the Balkans, the present is often perched precariously on top of the past.’

Hôtel Valencia Palace

Annie Perreault

Ce jour-là, comme chaque jour, des poissons avaient nagé au-dessus des têtes.

Valencia Palace Hotel

Annie Perreault

A story by Annie Perreault, translated from the French by Rhonda Mullins, for the online edition of Granta 141: Canada.

Best book of 1936: Locos

Ingrid Persaud

Ingrid Persaud on why Felipe Alfau’s Locos is the best book of 1936.

The Sweet Sop

Ingrid Persaud

‘The memory of chocolate made the man crazy to see me. I became Reggie’s dealer. A voice on the phone would whisper, ‘Two Kit Kat’ and hang up.’

Two Poems

Pascale Petit

‘His sheets smell of formalin. / She feels as if her insides // are outside her, in a freezer.’

Getting Away With It

Timothy Phillips

A case of Russian espionage from Tim Phillips' book The Secret Twenties: British Intelligence, the Russians, and the Jazz Age.

The False Lords of Misrule

Peter Pomerantsev

Peter Pomerantsev takes us on a tour of the lewd, crude language of modern politics – from Trump to Putin to Duterte, Milo Yianopoulos, Boris Johnson and more.

Pop-Up People

Peter Pomerantsev

We are living through a period of pop-up populism, where each political movement redefines ‘the Many’ and ‘the People’, where we are always reconsidering who counts as an ‘insider’ or an ‘outsider’, where what it means to belong is never certain.

Brother | State of Mind

Max Porter

‘We don’t often talk seriously or in depth about our childhood these days, but we know we could, and we know what good it did us.’

Chère Madame

Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust’s letters to his neighbour, translated from the French by Lydia Davis.

The Passing of the Contemplative Life

D. Ptryrczwz

‘she was not among those / I’d expected I might meet’

Ten Books that Changed the World

Martin Puchner

Martin Puchner on ten books that have changed the course of world history.

The Myth of Creative Genius

Natasha Pulley

‘There’s a mysticism that surrounds writing fiction.’

Introduction

Sigrid Rausing

‘Writing about other people doesn’t have to be an exercise of power or a theft of identity.’

Introduction

Sigrid Rausing

Sigrid Rausing introduces Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists 3.

Introduction

Sigrid Rausing

‘What’s in a state of mind? How do we describe emotions, or the complex relationship between individuals and the state?’

Victim Politics

Ben Rawlence

‘The push and pull of identity politics is the child of slavery and empire.’ Ben Rawlence on empire and the construction of white identity.

Old School

Xan Rice

‘Apartheid had marked him, as it has marked all of us, in different ways. It made me hyper-aware of colour.’

Gwendoline Riley | Five Things Right Now

Gwendoline Riley

Gwendoline Riley on Caspar David Friedrich, sketching and Chekhov.

Mangilaluk’s Highway

Nadim Roberts

‘They joked about how tough they’d be by the time they got home.’

Araben

Pooneh Rohi

‘Like all roads, this one too comes to an end.’ A Swedish novel that looks at the realities of the immigrant experience.

Mars is a Stupid Planet

Matthew Rohrer

‘Even astronauts describe / our air as thick enough to slice / and spread on toast for breakfast.’

Mistaken | State of Mind

Mary Ruefle

‘I take it, if only as a substitute for my unknown name’

Wallace Stevens’s Memory

Armand Garnet Ruffo

‘It was / a line that signaled absolute forgetting / and it made me want to weep into my drink’

Canopy

Naben Ruthnum

‘We think of L’Auberge as more of a sanatorium than a rehab. Certainly not as a mental hospital.’ Fiction from Naben Ruthrum.

George Saunders In Conversation | Podcast

George Saunders

A discussion of the mind of Abraham Lincoln, the art of creating historical voices, verbal improv and writing the afterlife.

Lincoln in the Bardo

George Saunders

‘Must I deny my predilection, and marry, and doom myself to a certain, shall we say, dearth of fulfillment?’

De roses et d’insectes

Chloé Savoie-Bernard

C’est une des premières choses que je lui ai dites, J’ai des daddy issues.

Of Roses and Insects

Chloé Savoie-Bernard

‘The insects dissect the layers of my father’s life, our lives and my mother’s life that have collected in this sad house.’ Translated from the French by Neil Smith.

Bina

Anakana Schofield

‘If you’ve come all this way here to listen to me, your life will undoubtedly get worse. I’m here to warn you, not to reassure you.’

The Peripatetic Penelope Fitzgerald

Lucy Scholes

Lucy Scholes on the highs, lows and package tours of Booker-prize-winning author Penelope Fitzgerald. ‘Fitzgerald’s life can only be attributed to the caprices of fate.’

Explain Her to Me

Lucy Scholes

Lucy Scholes on Harvey Weinstein, #MeToo and Rebecca Solnit

Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun

Paul Seesequasis

‘I began to look through archives, libraries, museums and private collections in search of images of Indigenous life that reflected integrity, strength, resourcefulness, hard work, family and play.’

Nothing to be afraid of | State of Mind

Anil K. Seth

‘Life in the first person is both magical and terrifying. But it is circumscribed.’ Anil K. Seth on the ties between our brains, bodies and consciousness.