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Golgotha

Benoit Jutras

‘Our nation is a spell of nerves and gas. We say yes to monsters, to elegies etched in our palms.’ Translated by Daniel Canty.

The Battlefield

Dominique Fortier

‘For years, you have been passing through my life; like a comet, disappearing as quickly as you come.’ Translated by Rhonda Mullins.

Le Cirque

Rawi Hage

‘Circuses have the capacity to transform those rejected by society – the acrobats, rope-walkers, puppeteers and expelled demons – into wonders and celebrities.’

Swimming Coach

Anosh Irani

‘He was at home in the water, and it was from here that he would find ways to live, reasons to live.’

Life of the Father

Alain Farah

‘Two times is a repetition. Three times is a tradition, or a curse.’ Translated from the French by Lazer Lederhendler.

Cloud Seeding

Krista Foss

‘It’s not a fairy tale or a mystery. It’s a transaction.’

Two Indians

Falen Johnson

‘I can’t go back there. I know what they think. I know what they see.’ A new play by Falen Johnson.

Song for Goliath

Kim Fu

‘I see them as a needlepoint sampler, / flowing script that reads: everyone suffers.’

Tshinanu

Naomi Fontaine

‘Language is a risk that a nation takes. If a language survives, its people do too.’ Translated from the French by David Homel.

Le Champ de Bataille

Dominique Fortier

J’ai un très grand chagrin d’amour. Et toi, qui aimes-tu? Les garçons ou les filles? Ou seulement les livres et les échecs?

Tshinanu

Naomi Fontaine

Plus tard, ils me diront comme tu étais un grand homme. Un savant. Un érudit de la chasse.

Vie du père

Alain Farah

L’homme dont les paroles ont inauguré cette histoire va donc voir ou plutôt revoir, alors qu’il se déplace dans un temps parallèle, les meilleures scènes de sa vie.

Théâtre Golgotha

Benoit Jutras

Nassau homme recouvert d’une couverture de laine assis au sol sous une série de clous...

The File: Lost Then Found

A.M. Homes

‘Even for those of us who feel we have integrated our history, there can be fragments, like shrapnel, that push to the surface without warning.’

Boathouse

Jon Fosse

‘It was this summer that the restlessness came over me.’ Translated from the Norwegian by May-Brit Akerholt.

Language In Exile

Mireille Gansel

One summer’s day, for the first time, Mitzi broached the past. Past in the present, so present, with everything it had deposited in this room that suddenly seemed so vast. Everything that the grim tide deposits on the shores of a life.

The Survivals of Lafcadio Hearn

Kenny Fries

‘Did Hearn feel comfortable in Japan because being a foreigner overshadowed his physical difference?’

Out of the Cell

Pico Iyer

‘I was inside a silence that was not an absence of noise so much as the living presence of everything I habitually walked – or sleep-walked – past.’

Water, Water, Everywhere

Darrell Hartman

Darrell Hartman on water: from diving to climate change, hurricanes Irma and Harvey to the advent of ‘Blue Mind’.

Second Mother

Sinéad Gleeson

‘The cortex shrinks where the cells used to be. The spaces in between expand. Islands in the sea of the mind. An archipelago of the former self.’ Sinéad Gleeson on Alzheimer's disease.

Sympathy | State of Mind

Rachel Hewitt

‘Before motherhood, I had not thought much about sympathy.’

Reading

David Hayden

‘When you die you revive in the world of the last book you were reading before your demise.’

Death House

Christina Hesselholdt

New fiction translated from the Danish by Paul Russell Garrett.

A Mingling | State of Mind

Siri Hustvedt

‘My empathy may become a vehicle of insight for me and therefore help me to help you or it may debilitate me altogether, make me so sad I am no good to you whatsoever.’

The Recall of Herman Harcourt

Colin Grant

‘I had the queer feeling of looking into a mirror of the projected future, of perhaps seeing how easily his fall could be a rehearsal for my own.’

Monster | State of Mind

Margo Jefferson

‘Today’s a day for you to feel blocked and impeded; a coward in work and love; resenting duty; suspecting pleasure.’

Saint Ivo

Joanna Hershon

‘This is where my imagination had gone: frittered away on longing and regret, just like everybody else.’

American Objects

Lucy Ives

‘My eyes were way too large. They appeared, if this is possible, independently scandalized.’

The Perfect Choice

Fleur Jaeggy

‘There are those who have an inborn gift for not being deceived in life.’ Translated from the Italian by Gini Alhadeff.

You Okay for Time?

Kaori Fujino

‘She wants to talk, she wants to unburden herself, but there’s nothing left so all she can do is cry.’ Translated by Ginny Tapley Takemori.

The Proof of Love

Catherine Hall

The Proof of Love won the Green Carnation Prize in 2011.

The Naming of Moths

Tracy Fells

‘Sophia no longer worries about how life smells, if she breathes in too deeply all she tastes is ash.’ The 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize winner from Canada and Europe.

Three Poems

Kim Kyung Ju

‘Underneath the leaves that stack my upper lip / the reindeer do not share their love.’ Translated from the Korean by Jake Levine.

On Jesus’ Son

Eli Goldstone

‘Jesus’ Son is a song, a glorious clear hymn, full of the notes of bad decisions, of rotten fucking luck, of causing real and lasting damage to yourself and to the people around you.’

Drawing Lessons

Anushka Jasraj

‘All colours are hurt spectacles, I think, and say aloud without intention.’ The 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize winner for Asia.

Train Dreams

Denis Johnson

In the summer of 1917 Robert Grainier took part in an attempt on the life of a Chinese laborer caught, or anyway accused of, stealing from the company stores of the Spokane International Railway in the Idaho Panhandle.