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The Most Common State of Matter

Cara Blue Adams

‘She was quietly awed by her own panic.’

Animalia

Jean-Baptiste Del Amo

An excerpt from Animalia by Jean-Baptiste Del Amo, translated from the French by Frank Wynne.

The Tension of Transience

Chloe Aridjis

‘How unusual that April night had been, yet how normal it had seemed at the time’

Diana Athill

Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood on Diana Athill. ‘Diana was admired by all who knew her, and also by all who read her memoirs, for her honesty, her plain but elegant style, her lack of pretenses, and her stoicism in the face of ever-narrowing possibilities.’

#TeamBaddiel vs #TeamBabel

David Baddiel

‘Social media has allowed everyone in the world to raise their own little flag of self’

10 Schools of Philosophy that should be better known (in the West)

Julian Baggini

The author of How The World Thinks: A Global History of Philosophy explains ten of the most overlooked philosophies from around the world.

A London View

Julian Barnes

Julian Barnes shares a view of London from his childhood.

On High Heels and Lotus Feet

Summer Brennan

Summer Brennan on high heels, foot-binding, and our ongoing performances of gender.

The Main Thing Is to Keep the Front Garden Immaculate

Simone Buchholz

An extract from Beton Rouge by Simone Buchholz, translated from the German by Rachel Ward.

Two Poems

Anthony Caleshu

‘Consider the dramatic events that become ordinary people like us.’

Cotton Variation

Cortney Lamar Charleston

‘fibrous little trauma fruit, wan little wound-licker’

Lazy Boy

Josh Cohen

‘I don’t see him staring back at me from the La-Z-Boy, I see me, I see a crystalline image of my own burned-out soul’

Charlotte Collins | Notes on Craft

Charlotte Collins

Charlotte Collins on the craft of translation. ‘Literary translators don’t just translate the ‘meaning’ of a text; we translate the feel of it.’

Two Poems

Julia Copus

‘The me that was then / follows, watching from the dark / theatre of my skull.’

Populism and Humour

William Davies

‘As reality has grown more absurd, the job of satirists has grown harder.’

The Silk Road

Kathryn Davis

‘The choice of starting point wasn’t important; the important thing was to cycle through the same sequence of edges.’