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Africa’s Future Has No Space for Stupid Black Men

Pwaangulongii Dauod

‘The night was full of energy. The kind of energy that Africa needs to reinvent itself.’

Arcadia

Emma Cline

‘Could a place work on you like an illness?’

Astrid Alben In Conversation: Podcast

Astrid Alben

Astrid Alben discusses her work, the interdisciplinary journal Pars, and developing a poetic alter ego.

Base Life

George Makana Clark

‘This is why he will survive this war to return to his wife and daughter, barring a blind bullet, an errant piece of shrapnel, some careless act of destiny.’

Before They Began to Shrink

Nic Dunlop

‘The numbers killed at Aughrim that day will never be known.’

Best Book of 1943: ­Love In A Fallen City­ by Eileen Chang

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan

‘Eileen Chang writes perfectly for the romantic in an unromantic and unrelenting world.’

Best Book of 1971: Malina by Ingeborg Bachmann

Kevin Breathnach

‘The novel submits to an internalized discipline: it is an observation machine’

Best Book of 1982: Dictee by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha

Eleanor Chandler

‘While the terrible pain of speech is made clear, this book ultimately reminds us that we must not be silenced.’

Best Book of 1991: Mao II by Don DeLillo

Colin Barrett

‘The ultimate goal of each act of art, each work of terror, is to demolish the old, incumbent reality, and create a new one.’

Best Book of 2000: The Moral Obligation to be Intelligent

Will Boast

Will Boast on why Lionel Trilling’s The Moral Obligation to be Intelligent is the best book of 2000.

Best Book of 2008: To the End of the Land, by David Grossman

Lily Dunn

‘David Grossman is a writer who speaks to the heart, and this is his masterpiece.’

Black Country

Anthony Cartwright

‘There’s a sense, I think, that what that X in the box translates as is seventeen and a half million voices that say, we’re still here.’

Brexit Win

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

‘The poor hated the poor, natives hated outsiders, settled migrants hated new incomers, the North hated the South, non-Londoners hated London.’

Bucharest, Broken City

Philip Ó Ceallaigh

‘It is only consciousness and memory that hold together the things we sometimes see as solid.’

Click

Brian Evenson

‘It wasn’t that he didn’t have a name, only that he was having difficulty locating it.’

Coventry

Rachel Cusk

‘War is a narrative: it might almost be said to embody the narrative principle itself.’

Cracking Up

Kevin Breathnach

‘It has been several weeks since I slept for more than an hour, and lately I’ve been feeling on the verge of cracking up.’

Crossings

Tim Beckett

‘This was the collective trauma of a community discovering, very abruptly, they’d have to uproot their lives.’ Tim Beckett on the ruins of Uranium City.

Diaries

Suzanne Brøgger

‘My habit of being a dreamer is filled with the joy of melancholy.’

Diary of a Gulag Prison Guard

Ivan Chistyakov

‘Freedom, even with hunger and cold, is still precious and irreplaceable.’

Drama Lessons for Young Girls

Tara Bergin

‘So the young girls, / cast as naughty young girls from the Acropolis, / left – / just with some things missing.’

Enjaracon Sponaeda

Will Alexander

‘how can all the pressures of surveillance / fail to describe me?’

Ethelbert and the Free Cheese

Lance Dowrich

‘It was against the understood traditions of society to prepare Sunday lunch without macaroni pie.’ 2016 Commonwealth Short Story Prize – regional winner for the Caribbean.

Five Things Right Now: Ann Beattie

Ann Beattie

Ann Beattie shares five things she’s reading, watching and thinking about right now.

Five Things Right Now: Diane Cook

Diane Cook

Diane Cook shares five things she’s reading, watching and thinking about right now.

Fly

Feng Sun Chen

‘Every day, I see a monstrosity in the kissing hole.’

Free will and Brexit

Julian Baggini

‘Whether or not you think 23 June was a great day for Britain and Europe, it was a very bad one for freedom.’

Granta Reads: Angela Carter’s ‘Cousins’

Angela Carter

In this Halloween edition of the Granta podcast, Josie Mitchell reads Angela Carter’s 1980 short story, ‘Cousins’. The first in our Halloween series.

Green, Mud, Gold

Sara Baume

‘She shuts her eyes and pictures ears growing out through her ears, her spine turning to wood, pictures herself as a girl-woman scarecrow, arms opened wide, and nailed to two posts in the centre of a great green, mud and gold expanse, crucified.’

He Had His Reasons

Colin Barrett

Colin Barrett on the Hawe family murder-suicide, and what the Irish media’s coverage tells us about the nation’s prejudices.

Here We Are

Lucy Caldwell

‘‘Here we are,’ she said, as we faced each other, and my whole body rushed with goosebumps.’

His Middle Name Was Not Jesus

NoViolet Bulawayo

‘He didn’t know their language but understood it in their boiling voices, the heat on their faces, how they singed each other with their eyes.’

Inside the house

Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

‘the bell / was ringing from the chapel, they were there / expecting her.’

Is Fraid I Fraid Calendars

Vahni Capildeo

‘Haven’t you noticed people / are different since then?’

Lucia Series

Jesse Ball

‘People love to say it to you like it counts: Oh, Lucia, she will live on in your memory.’